The Rainy Pot in action. The Colossal Shop

Are you guilty of forgetting your succulents? Meet Rainy Pot.

By now I've lost track of the times I have brought home a succulent, in hopes of transforming my kitsch-strewn apartment into something more earthy-minimalist and chic. But each tiny cactus I've drowned by giving too much water (call it over-excitement), or just kind of lost track of, which is what happens when you have wooden animal carvings and Pez dispensers blanketing most surfaces. 

Hence the thrill of Rainy Pot, an "emotional wall-hanging flower pot," by the design whizzes at Daily Life Lab. Not only does the Rainy Pot allow for mounting plants vertically (solving the issue of "where did my succulent go?"), it also meters out how much water the green-ling receives. Simply pour into its cloud-shaped basin over the plant, and the Pot evenly sprinkles "rain." Available in bright shades of blue and green, your plants will be too adorable to neglect.

As for the "emotional" bit, watch the short promo below, which sets the drama of Rainy Pot to a poignant piano tune.

Rainy Pot, $24.00 at The Colossal Shop

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