AirVR/Kickstarter

The AirVR brings virtual reality closer than ever.

Now there's a foolproof way to identify and avoid tech fanatics who never shut up about Apple: A virtual-reality headset that incorporates an iPad—and incorporates it directly onto your face.

This honest-to-god real thing—it's raised more than $12,000 on Kickstarter—was dreamed up by Metatecture, a design studio in Toronto. The AirVR uses Apple's ballyhooed Retina display, a pair of goggles, and a spelunking headstrap to produce 3-D images before your very eyes. "Virtual Reality is finally within our reach," writes its creator. "But cost, availability, and a lack of content have kept it from becoming a part of everyday life, until now."

I don't have much else to say about this, except that it's possibly the best new way to get robbed. So instead, here are some photos of people wearing the innovatively ridiculous device. I personally love the one where it looks like a guy's trying to rip it off his noggin, facehugger style:

(Kickstarter)

H/t DesignTAXI

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