An L.A. photographer pieces time-lapsed collages of urban landscapes into remarkable photos.  

For photographer Dan Marker-Moore, finding the right light can get complicated. His photos require near perfect sunlight, moonlight, clear skies, and an uninterrupted view of the city skyline. If an unexpected rain shower shows up, his days-long work is likely ruined. A less-than-spectacular sunset will force him to pack up his equipment as well.

But when the light—along with several other highly specific factors—is just right, Marker-Moore can capture the urban landscape in a truly remarkable way.

(Dan Marker-Moore)

Using a technique called "Time Slicing," the L.A.-based photographer manipulates a series of photos into one final image. Rather than settling for a single shot of the Hollywood sunset, for example, Marker-Moore might take 11 over over the course of an hour. Then, like a puzzle, he'll assemble the photos into one time-lapsed picture—and that captures the beautiful transition a city undergoes during dusk.

"When you are shooting a Time Slice, nothing complements the graduation to darkness more than illumination of lights from the city," Marker-Moore says. The project, which he began about a year and a half ago, emerged out of a desire to capture the progression of time in a still photo. Doing so, however, requires some serious patience and navigation. The moon's location changes each month, so Marker-Moore traverses the hills of L.A. trying to track down the best view. Moreover, "a lot of [the pictures] fall flat," he acknowledges, often leaving him with, "grey sunsets, foggy sunrises, or cloudy moonrises." The demands of the project, however, don't dampen the experience for him.

"Nothing is really frustrating about the process", he says. "Going to a remote location high above the city and taking a long break to watch the sunset while the camera takes a picture is great." Marker-Moore and his girlfriend sometimes will use the project to schedule a date night; they bring a picnic up to the L.A. hills and watch as the burning sky settles into a brightly lit cityscape. Now and then, Marker-Moore will get up and snap another photo. Not a bad way to work. (See more of his photos below)

Chicago over one hour, 18 minutes, and 39 photos. (Dan Marker-Moore)
Toronto over one hour, 53 minutes, and 40 photos. (Dan Marker-Moore)
Moonrise in Los Angeles. (Dan Marker-Moore)
New York over two hours, three minutes, and 38 photos. (Dan Marker-Moore)
Thirty minutes of sunrise in L.A. (Dan Marker-Moore)

All photos courtesy of Dan Marker-Moore. You can see more of his work here.

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