Scenepast

ScenePast lets you send a note with a classic 20th century streetscape from your mobile device. But it's also got an addictive second feature.

If you love sending classic postcards but never remember to actually mail them, you can (sort of) make up for it with a new $0.99 cent app.

"ScenePast Americana Road Trip" offers digital versions of over 500 20th century American postcards. Organized by location, users can get their nostalgia itch scratched rather easily.

The app allows you to send a digital "postcard" with your own message via email or social media. But by far the best feature is when you're ready to return to the 21st century, ScenePast lets you compare each old postcard image to the exact same spot as it appears today. For any 'then and now' addict, this is dangerous; the app lets you quickly travel the country in search of every town and city's most iconic spots and see just how much they have (or haven't) changed over the last century:

Old South Meeting House (1900s Postcard), 310 Washington St, Boston, MA
Thames Street (Newport, RI) - (1910s Postcard), 212 Thames Street, Newport, RI
Rand's Round-Up Restaurant  (1940s Postcard), 7580 Sunset Boulevard, Hollywood, CA
Disneyland – Tomorrowland (1960s Postcard), Tomorrowland Way, Anaheim, CA
Same Location 3 times (128 Fremont Street, Las Vegas, NV): Apache Hotel (1950s Postcard), Binion’s Horseshoe (1970s Postcard), Binion’s Gambling Hall (Today)
Grauman's Chinese Theatre - (1930s Postcard), 6925 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood, CA
Century Plaza Hotel (1960s Postcard), 2025 Avenue of the Stars, Century City, CA.
Quincy Market (1910s Postcard), 4 South Market, Boston, MA
Quincy Market (1910s Postcard), 4 South Market, Boston, MA
Coney Island (The Cyclone) (1940s Postcard), 1000 Surf Avenue, Brooklyn, NY
Rockefeller Center (1950s Postcard), 45 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, NY

ScenePast Americana Road Trip is available at the iTunes store for $0.99.

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