Kickstarter

Half pillow, half oven mitt—all comfort.

Two years ago we introduced you to the plush-bag-over-your-head-style "Ostrich Pillow," which allowed you to snooze on your face—anywhere, anytime—in comfort and while looking not unlike a Teletubby. Now, while Apple may be going bigger with the iPhone, Studio Banana (the developers behind the Ostrich Pillow) is scaling down the Ostrich Pillow to a non-ridiculous, actually useful size.

In less than 48 hours on Kickstarter, the Ostrich Pillow Mini raised over $15,000 in funding. Nearly 500 people pledged money to distribute the oven-mitt-like pillow, which slips onto your hand. The mini version essentially pads your hand, arm, or elbow—any part you'd naturally rest your head upon when taking a short nap.

(Studio Banana)

Studio Banana anticipates that the first batch of Ostrich Pillow Minis will be available for retail during the first weeks of December, right before the holiday travel season. Don't be left wrestling with that outdated old neck pillow when you could be drooling on the next big thing in catnaps.

(Studio Banana)

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