Aminimal Studio

"Urban Gridded Dogtags" take cartographic bling to the next level.

Some folks show love for their city by getting a tattoo. But for those who aren't ready to get inked, a nice alternative are these stylish and intricately honeycombed "Urban Gridded Dogtags."

The chemically etched trinkets, now preordering for $50 to $100, are made by Brooklyn's Aminimal Studio using GPS info from OpenStreetMap. There's Chicago, Central Park, San Francisco, and many other major metropolitan areas, and the studio has plans to create even more, which should please the fans of Boise and the Tokyo Imperial Palace. It hopes the shiny tags will catch on as unisex jewelry for "architects, cartographers, urban planners, urban explorers, nomads, travelers, jet setters," and presumably those who can never remember how to get places.

Here's Aminimal with more:

Inspired by travel, the Urban Gridded Jewelry collection includes over 120+ major cities from 32 countries around the word. Urban Gridded dog tags are a homage to your favorite cities. Commemorating where you came from or where you want to go. A special place spent with loved ones or safe travels to the next city. Even useful as a functional map.

Take a look at this cartographic bling:

San Francisco
Central Park
Chicago
Venice

H/t Moco Loco

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