Why settle for regular stripes when you can sport a pattern made from video footage of Fort Greene or Red Hook?

Do you live in BKLYN?

So do the creators of these scarves by Brooklyn Block, with neighborhood-inspired patterns.

The project started as an experiment in which videos of several Brooklyn neighborhoods were run through a code that generated patterns with the color and textures from the images.

The patterns on Brooklyn Block scarves represent different neighborhoods' shapes and colors. (Brooklyn Block)

Architect Sanksshep Mahendra and Interaction Designer Namrata Vansadia—the duo behind the project—wanted to represent the character of the borough in a product. So they printed the patterns on a cotton scarf. The casual collaboration soon morphed into a product-based startup.

"We live in Brooklyn and have seen it change, mutate, and merge gradually in its semi-grid structure," they write in an email. "The elegant historic Brooklyn is meeting the audacious contemporary Brooklyn—it is interesting to see this transition and translate it into a product."

This is what you'd look like if you were wearing a Red Hook scarf in Red Hook. (Brooklyn Block)

They're working now on variations of code to change up the patterns. In December, these patterns will be printed on fancy silk and cashmere. This means you could strut around Fort Greene this winter with a cashmere version of Fort Greene wrapped around your neck. Meta.

The cotton voile scarves are available for $50 at The Brooklyn Block.

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