A hostage runs towards a police officer outside Lindt cafe in Sydney, Australia. Reuters/Jason Reed

The hashtag was trending worldwide on Monday morning.

Amid the hostage crisis in Sydney, Australia—which now appears to have finally come to an end—social media is overflowing with the hashtag #illridewithyou. Meant initially as an offer to actually ride with Muslims who might feel unsafe using public transportation in the wake of the hostage situation, the hashtag has now been adopted globally as a gesture of solidarity with Muslims everywhere.

The hashtag was created when Twitter user @MichaelJames_TV shared a screenshot of a woman’s Facebook status about how she tried to comfort a Muslim woman at a train station.

Another Twitter user, @sirtessa, came up with the idea for the hashtag after retweeting the interaction.

From there, it took off.

As always, though, there are some curmudgeons.

As of Monday morning the hashtag was trending worldwide. For updates on the situation, The Guardian's Sydney bureau is running a live-blog.

This post originally appeared on Quartz, an Atlantic partner site.

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