A concept for one commuter bag to rule them all.

It can cradle a newborn, ward off wet weather, and haul a spine-cracking 13 gallons (or more) of cargo: It's the Bigo "Bag Five," a morphing, multiuse accessory that's bound to delight urban cyclists and lovers of topological mathematics.

In its most basic form, the (unfortunately named) Bigo slings over the shoulder like a sleeping bag-sized duffel. But the Budapest-based makers of this cycling satchel were not content with a piddling single function, so they designed it to transform into this half-body rain poncho:

Don't mind the rider's insanely fixed stare, he's merely thinking of what to turn the bag into next. What about a blanket to keep one's derriere cozy for a snow picnic?

Little guys need protection, too, and for that the bag mutates into a baby's swaddle-pod:

Sometimes chores involve hauling big loads—think of lugging clothes to the laundromat, or in this economy, collecting bottles and cans for beer money. For these bulky jobs, the Bigo can zip onto another Bigo, creating a gigantic sack capable of hauling a 50-gallon oil drum.

"There is really no limit to how many bags you can zip together," says the Bigo team. So head to Indiegogo and snatch up these limited-run items for $139 a pop, and see how big a bag you can build. Put an entire Costco run in a bag! Put a drum set in a bag! Stuff your friends in a bag! The sky's the limit with this baby (or maybe it's the weight capacity of your poor, groaning bicycle).

The roughly 2-pound Bag 5, packed into its wearable "bumbag" case. (Bigo)

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