Designer Rachel Binx is offering cartographic tops and skirts powered by OpenStreetMap data.

Ever wanted to rep exactly your block in Queens? Move over, "I Heart NY" shirts— Monochōme, a new project from data visualization specialist Rachel Binx, is here to help. The project's customizable line of tank tops and skirts are printed with maps designed by Binx and ripped straight from OpenStreetMap data. Just pick your threads, enter your address, and choose between two map styles.

Taking Brooklyn's Williamsburg neighborhood to the streets. (Rachel Binx)
Lost in San Francisco's Mission District? Check out this lady's skirt. (Rachel Binx)

Though OpenStreetMap doesn't cover every neighborhood ever, it's an open data source, which means you can add the info yourself.

Sick of explaining where you live? Just pull on your new skirt and point.

Monochōme skirts and tanks, $45-$75 at Monochōme.

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