Michael Dwyer/AP

One Twitter user's suggested Olympics motto: "Fastah, Highah, Wicked Strong."

After the U.S. Olympic Committee announced Boston as the U.S. bid to host the 2024 Olympic Games, the Internet exploded with cries of triumph and anguish. The outpouring of glee and pride was sincere.

Then the fun started.

Naturally, politicians are required to chime in on these sorts of announcements.  

But it's way more fun to read the jokes.

No one who knows someone from Boston was spared the Boston triumphalism.

Let 'em have it. If Boston is picked over the other international cities competing to host the games, it will need to represent the U.S. on the global stage. That's going to come at considerable cost. The possibility that it could go wrong for taxpayers is real.

But if Boston gets the bid—and then does it right—then the city can look forward to internal improvements and gratitude from everyone else.

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