Michael Dwyer/AP

One Twitter user's suggested Olympics motto: "Fastah, Highah, Wicked Strong."

After the U.S. Olympic Committee announced Boston as the U.S. bid to host the 2024 Olympic Games, the Internet exploded with cries of triumph and anguish. The outpouring of glee and pride was sincere.

Then the fun started.

Naturally, politicians are required to chime in on these sorts of announcements.  

But it's way more fun to read the jokes.

No one who knows someone from Boston was spared the Boston triumphalism.

Let 'em have it. If Boston is picked over the other international cities competing to host the games, it will need to represent the U.S. on the global stage. That's going to come at considerable cost. The possibility that it could go wrong for taxpayers is real.

But if Boston gets the bid—and then does it right—then the city can look forward to internal improvements and gratitude from everyone else.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A man and a woman shop at a modern kiosk by a beach in a vintage photo.
    Design

    Why Everyday Architecture Deserves Respect

    The places where we enact our daily lives are not grand design statements, yet they have an underrated charm and even nobility.

  2. A chef prepares food at a restaurant in Beijing, China.
    Life

    What Restaurant Reviews Reveal About Cities

    Where official census data is sparse, MIT researchers find that restaurant review websites can offer similar demographic and economic information.

  3. The Cincinnati skyline and river
    Life

    Maps Reveal Where the Creative Class Is Growing

    “The rise of the rest” may soon become a reality as once-lagging cities see growth of creative class employment.

  4. A photo of anti-gentrification graffiti in Washington, D.C.
    Equity

    The Hidden Winners in Neighborhood Gentrification

    A new study claims the effects of neighborhood change on original lower-income residents are largely positive, despite fears of spiking rents and displacement.

  5. The legs of a crash-test dummy.
    Transportation

    A Clue to the Reason for Women’s Pervasive Car-Safety Problem

    Crash-test dummies are typically models of an average man. Women are 73 percent more likely to be injured in a car accident. These things are probably connected.

×