London bangle by McKean Studio.

These colorful, gold-plated bangles feature landmarks big and small.

You could collect a charm from each city you visit—if you’re living in the 1990s—or you could pick up a stack of these chic bangles from McKean Studio. Each one is inspired by a city and features a miniature skyline of icons big and small. The London bangle includes the Eye, Buckingham Palace, and doubledecker buses, while New York’s got the Empire State Building, the Statue of Liberty, and a hot dog cart.

New York bangle by McKean Studio

So far Paris, San Francisco, Melbourne, Palm Springs, and Sydney have also gotten the bangle treatment, each one hand-finished in a different bright enamel color. Husband-and-wife designers Joshua and Megan McKean draw inspiration from their travels around the globe, so if your city isn’t on that list, it’s probably not too far behind. Cast in stainless steel and plated in 18-karat gold, these bangles are a subtle and stylish way for city lovers to wear their hearts (literally) on their sleeves.

San Francisco bangle by McKean Studio
Sydney bangle by McKean Studio
Palm Springs bangle by McKean Studio

Bangle, $66 AUD (approx. $50 USD) at McKean Studio

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