Senz

Dutch designers want you to put away that awful-looking rain poncho.

Want to bike in the rain but hate the frumpy look of ponchos? Then perhaps try the Senz umbrella holder, a canopy system for cyclists that can withstand face-ripping 60 mph storm gusts (though it's not advised).

The strange-looking umbrella has been on the market for a while. The invention of Dutch designer Gerwin Hoogendoorn, the Senz employs an unorthodox, wedge-shaped cover that doesn't invert into a useless cup during a powerful gale. (To believe this write-up, Hoogendoorn arrived at the concept only after toying with "helicopter-like constructions for the top of the head, and magnetic fields which were meant to keep the rain off.") Skip to 1:00 and look at this baby go:

But now the Senz people have come out with an umbrella stand that attaches to a bike's handlebars for fast-moving protection. Here's their pitch:

There has been many a day where we have been soaked to the skin whilst biking in the rain. Getting caught out without cover, can make for a very bad hair day. Here at senz°, we are proud to announce our solution to staying dry—the senz° umbrella holder.

A clamp that holds your senz° smart and original umbrella on your bicycle, whilst cycling, provides the perfect roof over your head. You are able to keep both hands free whilst maintaining a clear view, due to the short front of the canopy. It's easy to attach and folds away neatly when dry. The senz° umbrella holder really is the solution for dry journeys on wet days.

At about $47 on top of the umbrella's base cost of $80, this thing is not a cheap way to escape a drizzly commute. And I'm thinking it might cause balance trouble by altering a rider's wind dynamics. Perhaps for this reason, the company says the holder is "not intended for use in strong winds." Still, it's nice to know there's another way to bike in foul weather—and dodge those troublesome bird attacks that can sometimes befall a rider.

(Senz)

H/t Momentum Mag

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