Dutch Lab

Show your love for Paris with Dutch Lab's Eiffel Tower cold brew device.

Who says you can't start dreaming about cold-brewed coffee in winter? This slender apparatus by Dutch Lab, a Korean design studio, is as much a sculpture as it is a practical kitchen appliance. The laser-cut aluminum frame, modeled after Paris’s Eiffel Tower, encloses three borosilicate glasses for making coffee the Japanese way, with cold water. Just put your coffee grounds in the middle glass, water in the top glass, and your cold cuppa will start filtering into the flask below. It takes a lot longer to brew coffee this way—they don’t call it “slow-drip” for nothing—but the view can’t be beat.

The Eiffel Tower brewer comes in two stylized 500ml and 1000ml forms, as well as a larger, more ornate 2000ml model. Either way, you’ll get to play architect—the pieces ship flat, so assembly is required. And if Paris doesn't suit your fancy, you can show off your London or New York pride with Dutch Lab’s Big Ben and Empire State Building (with rampaging King Kong) designs.

Eiffel Tower coffee maker (500ml), $340 at Dutch Lab.

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