In this absurdist sketch, a New York MTA train operator crosses the line.

Think public transportation etiquette messages have gotten a little preachy lately? You're not alone. In this film by comedians Gianmarco Soresi and Megan Sass, New York MTA riders have to deal with one seriously judgmental train operator.

"Ladies and gentlemen, remember to take your garbage with you and deposit it in the nearest trash receptacle," the disembodied voice says. "Also, recycle. Global climate change is real, and it began with you."

Soresi says he was inspired by the real PSA heard at the beginning of the sketch, telling riders to "stand up for what's right" by offering their seats to pregnant women. "I certainly didn’t disagree with the sentiment," he says, "but I thought it was so odd... that the MTA would kind of make a moral judgment." He and Sass riffed on that to come up with the rest of the jokes, imagining a subway announcer pushing a political agenda—not to mention a hard line on dogs versus cats. Then the two comics rounded up a bunch of their friends, hopped on the A train, and filmed in a corner of the car until the end of the line.

Both comedians have their subway pet peeves, of course—especially riders who don't use headphones when they play music or video games. ("I recently quit Candy Crush and I'm like an alcoholic in a bar [when I] hear that music playing again," says Soresi.) But Sass thinks there's an easier way to improve the commute without publicly shaming all passengers: "I think everyone on the subway should have a bigger sense of humor."

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