Colossal

Bring the look and feel of roadway negligence to your coffee table.

Sit up straight. Keep your feet off the furniture. Use a coaster. You heard this a million times as a kid and, consequently, grew to hate the flimsy little things. Water rings are unsightly, sure, but are coasters any better?

They are now, thanks to Taiwan-based designer Sean Tsai. He's given the humble coaster a much-needed functional upgrade, as well as an infrastructure-minded aesthetic.

Colossal

Made out of recycled ash mixed with cement, these coasters come in gray and black, and each one has a unique crack pattern that actually works to absorb moisture, so they won't slip, slide, or stick to the bottom of a glass. With these sturdy items in your cabinet, next time you'll do the nagging.

Colossal

Concrete coaster, $12 (or four for $45) at The Colossal Shop.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A photo of a visitor posing for a photo with Elvis in downtown Nashville
    Perspective

    Cities: Don’t Fall in the Branding Trap

    From Instagram stunts to Edison bulbs, why do so many cities’ marketing plans try to convince people that they’re exactly like somewhere else?

  2. Amazon HQ2

    Without Amazon HQ2, What Happens to Housing in Queens?

    The arrival of the tech company’s new headquarters was set to shake up the borough’s real estate market, driving up rents and spurring displacement. Now what?

  3. Transportation

    You Can’t Design Bike-Friendly Cities Without Considering Race and Class

    Bike equity is a powerful tool for reducing inequality. Too often, cycling infrastructure is tailored only to wealthy white cyclists.

  4. Equity

    The FBI's Forgotten War on Black-Owned Bookstores

    At the height of the Black Power movement, the Bureau focused on the unlikeliest of public enemies: black independent booksellers.

  5. a photo of a used needle in a park in Lawrence, Massachusetts.
    Equity

    Why the Rural Opioid Crisis Is Different From the Urban One

    As deaths from heroin, fentanyl, and prescription opioids soar in the U.S., a new study looks at the geographic factors driving the drug overdose epidemic.