Colossal

Bring the look and feel of roadway negligence to your coffee table.

Sit up straight. Keep your feet off the furniture. Use a coaster. You heard this a million times as a kid and, consequently, grew to hate the flimsy little things. Water rings are unsightly, sure, but are coasters any better?

They are now, thanks to Taiwan-based designer Sean Tsai. He's given the humble coaster a much-needed functional upgrade, as well as an infrastructure-minded aesthetic.

Colossal

Made out of recycled ash mixed with cement, these coasters come in gray and black, and each one has a unique crack pattern that actually works to absorb moisture, so they won't slip, slide, or stick to the bottom of a glass. With these sturdy items in your cabinet, next time you'll do the nagging.

Colossal

Concrete coaster, $12 (or four for $45) at The Colossal Shop.

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