Single Atlas

If your quest for "the one" spans oceans, here's an atlas that can guide you.

"There are just not enough eligible men on the East Coast" and "all the dateable women on the West Coast are taken" are complaints that have some truth to them. So if you're having no luck with the dating scene in your current U.S. locale, and you're (quite a bit) of a romantic, you can set sail for a different country in search of your perfect mate.

The Singles Atlas can guide you. The map uses demographic datasets from countries around the world and (if you're heterosexual) reveals where you're likely to find a single person of the opposite sex.

I tried it out. To start, I made adjustments so the map knows what I'm looking for. I selected my gender (woman) and the age group of the mate I'm seeking (eh, let's say 25 to 39). There are filters for height and body mass index of the person you seek (if you're superficial) as well as country-specific filters for education level, living cost, local buying power, and English proficiency. For now, I've set these to "all."

According to my specifications, the map color codes countries based on where I have good (green), medium (yellow), and bad (red) odds of finding several single men and not much competition. Qatar seems to be my best bet, with 424 men who meet my criteria per every 100 women:

Actually, if you notice that little box on the right—showing places with my best mate prospects—it seems that there are a lot of nice, young, single gentleman in Gulf countries. Too bad I'm not allowed to drive in Saudi Arabia.

Sadly, a lot of places I'd love to visit—such as Malaysia, Lebanon, Macau, and the Gambia—are stuffed with women. In Malaysia, for example, there are just 91 men between 25 and 39 for every 100 women. I don't really want to be the 101st and add to the competition:

For me, it seems that the countries where all the single men are concentrated are not always the countries I want to visit. But you know what they say: love conquers all.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a photo of the Eiffel Tower with the words "Made for Sharing" projected on it
    Life

    How France Tries to Keep English Out of Public Life

    France has a long history of using official institutions to protect the French language from outside influence. Still, English keeps working its way in.

  2. Warren Logan
    Transportation

    A City Planner Makes a Case for Rethinking Public Consultation

    Warren Logan, a Bay Area transportation planner, has new ideas about how to truly engage diverse communities in city planning. Hint: It starts with listening.

  3. a photo of a school bus in traffic
    Transportation

    Boston Saved $5 Million by Routing School Buses with an Algorithm

    With 25,000 students and the nation’s highest transportation costs, the Boston Public School District needed a better way to get kids to class.

  4. People standing in line with empty water jugs.
    Environment

    Cape Town’s ‘Day Zero’ Water Crisis, One Year Later

    In spring 2018, news of the water crisis in South Africa ricocheted around the world—then the story disappeared. So what happened?

  5. a photo of a pedestrian in Jakarta.
    Transportation

    The World's Most Traffic-Snarled City Tries a New Fix: Sidewalks

    Traffic, smog, and lack of sidewalks make the Indonesian megacity hard on pedestrians. But foot-friendly infrastructure is finally coming.

×