Or just use it to chase children around—your choice.

@kingscrossN1C/Wikipedia

Fans of classic video games and public art have scored a double-win in London, where a fountain has been transformed into a playable version of the 1970s-era maze-runner, "Snake."

To play the game—originally released as "Blockade" before "Snake" became the informal title for knockoffs—people first download an app called Squirt. They then connect to the Wi-Fi in King's Cross Granary Square to take control of 1,000 individually programmed water jets. By twisting the phone back and forth, players steer one of eight battling serpents around obstacles and each other's tails—or just chase toddlers around like a big meanie, to believe this video.

A reporter from Time Out London took the fountain for a recent test ride, and declared it "harder than normal 'Snake,' as I recall—I don't remember being this crap at it.'" But good news awaits those who pine for different classics. The organizers of this intervention say "new games will be released throughout the year," providing that Atari-style action on public property will always be in vogue.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A young girl winces from the sting as she receives the polio vaccine in 1954.
    Life

    How Mandatory Vaccination Fueled the Anti-Vaxxer Movement

    To better understand the controversy over New York’s measles outbreak, you have to go back to the late 19th century.

  2. People eat and drink coffee inside a small coffeehouse.
    Life

    Gentrification Is Hurting Kuala Lumpur's Iconic Coffee Shops

    Traditional kopitiams, which serve sweetened coffee in no-frills surroundings, are a part of Malaysian national identity, but their survival is precarious.

  3. A group of students talk as one tests a pedal-free bicycle they have built.
    Environment

    How an Ancestor of the Bicycle Relates to Climate Resilience

    Architecture students in Buffalo built their own versions of the "laufmaschine," a proto-bike invented in response to a 19th-century environmental crisis.

  4. Charts

    The Evolution of Urban Planning in 10 Diagrams

    A new exhibit from the San Francisco Planning and Urban Research Association showcases the simple visualizations of complex ideas that have changed how we live.

  5. Design rendering of a high-tech floating city.
    Environment

    Floating Cities Aren’t the Answer to Climate Change

    UN-Habitat is looking at high-tech urban islands as a potential survival fix for communities at risk from rising seas. This isn’t what resilience looks like.