"Go in with the graveness and seriousness of a court date."

Are you mystified by the decorum of third-wave coffee shops? Do terms like "single-origin," "crema," and "flat white" sound like gibberish to you? If so, check out this, umm, novice's guide to ordering coffee, courtesy of Portlandia's Fred Armisen and Carrie Brownstein.

In this episode of the Cooking Channel's "You're Eating It Wrong," (or in this case, Drinking It Wrong) the pair explore the finer points of coffee shop etiquette, from tipping technique—"Make it appear as if it just got in there on its own"—to the intricate ballet of sipping coffee while talking about something serious. With tips like these, there's no excuse to come across like a Folgers-drinking plebe again.

[via The Sporkful]

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