Non-Useless

This concrete cone keeps your umbrella and your floors dry.

Let's assume you know how to use an umbrella—but what do you do with it once you're indoors? The plastic bags you'll find in many lobbies just trap rainwater, leaving umbrellas damp and mildewy. But if you prop an umbrella open to dry, it'll drip puddles onto the floor and take up a lot of real estate. A bathtub or bucket will do in a pinch, but an elegant long-stemmed umbrella demands an elegant storage solution.

A better way to stash it between uses: the "Catch My Drip" umbrella holder from Montreal-based design duo Non-Useless. Just secure your umbrella upside down and rainwater will collect in the concrete cone, not on your floors.

Each umbrella holder is finished with a bright coat of paint, bringing some much-needed color to dreary days. (On sunnier ones, it makes for a stylish doorstop.) The hole in the top won't accommodate the blunt end of a cheap throwaway umbrella, so consider this your cue to commit to the taller, sturdier variety. It's a solid investment for people who live in Seattle—or any of the other, rainier cities across the U.S.

Umbrella holder, $61-$69 at Non-Useless (via designboom).

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