Steve McDonald

Fantastic Cities is filled with intricate urban worlds.

Adult coloring books are a thing now, according to the New York Times. And while we wouldn't blame you for pooh-poohing the latest trend piece from the paper of record, we have to admit that this new book of DIY cityscapes is downright exquisite.

Steve McDonald
Steve McDonald

Fantastic Cities, by Canadian artist Steve McDonald, is 48 pages of "real and imagined" aerial vistas. From San Francisco's steep hills and Manhattan's skyscraper canyons to an arresting mandala modeled on a town in Ontario, these highly detailed drawings offer plenty of nooks and crannies for crayons, colored pencils, and the like. Stay in the lines, or don't. You are a grown-up who likes to color.

Steve McDonald

'Fantastic Cities,' $14.95 at Chronicle Books.

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