A Toronto Public Library interactive lets you explore local geography through poems that mention the city.

Poets often infuse the sights, sounds, smells, and feels of their hometown into their verses. That's true of lyricists old and new; the rapper Drake often features Toronto in his rhymes, for instance, and he's not the only poet to use that city as a muse.

Now, the Toronto Public Library and Canadian poet laureate George Elliot Clarke have designed an interactive map that lets you explore the city's geography through other poems that mention the city.

Clicking on one of the map's location markers pulls up excerpts from poems in the library's collection that mention the chosen site. For people who want to read more, the library links to the books in which the entire poem appears.

Let's say I click on Toronto's Union Station:

Here are some of the poem excerpts that pop up:

Of course, the library's list of Toronto-related poems isn't exhaustive—they obviously left out Drake. So if you spot a poem that you think should be included, submit it here.

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