oopsmark

Warning: Not for use on an actual, moving bicycle.

It's tough to be a cycling enthusiast working a desk job. Instead of speeding down a bike trail, you’re stuck in one place for eight hours a day as your body deteriorates from prolonged sitting. But here’s a way to bring a bit of cycling style into the office.

Montreal-based design firm oopsmark has created a laptop stand from refurbished bicycle handlebars. It comes equipped with a leather cable-fastener to keep your charger and headphone wires in place, and non-slip grip pads to keep your laptop stable.

(oopsmark)

Best of all, the stand incorporates locally sourced and recycled goods. All the handlebars come from Rebicycle, a used bicycle shop in Montreal.

A look at Rebicycle, the cycling shop that supplies the materials for the laptop stand. (Jesse Herbert/oopsmark)

So if Excel spreadsheets are stressing you out, just grab the sides of this laptop stand. Close your eyes, and you'll be cruising down your favorite trail.

Bicycle Handlebar Laptop Stand, $99.00 at oopsmark.

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