Uh-oh. Mariyana M / Shutterstock.com

Stop showing up to work wearing your morning cup of joe.

A crisp white blouse is a workday staple. So is coffee. Unfortunately, the two don't make such a great couple.

Elizabeth & Clarke

Women's clothing company Elizabeth & Clarke is tackling the dilemma. They're aiming to release un-stainable t-shirts and blouses. Inspired by the process of water beading and rolling off flowers and leaves, the machine-washable crepe de Chine and cotton garments (currently in the Kickstarter phase) repel water- and oil-based liquid spills before they absorb into the fabric, thanks to fibers 100,000 smaller than a grain of sand. So go ahead and pour that second cup.

Pre-order t-shirt, $25, and blouse, $40, at Kickstarter.com (via FastCompany).

Top image: Mariyana M / Shutterstock.com.

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