A free-runner laughs at death by leaping across the side of a Dubai tower.

Five leaps, five good shots at becoming street pancake—that about sums up this stomach-jolting parkour excursion more than 40 stories above Dubai.

The leaper in question is Russia’s Oleg Sherstyachenko, who goes appropriately by “Oleg Cricket.” The fearsomely abbed free-runner with the Flock of Seagullsesque mane embarked on the stunt as a plug for Bankai, a performance company specializing in high-wire acrobatics. The Cricket reportedly used no safety wires or other contraptions guaranteeing his non-death.

Almost as good as the run are the comments posted to the video, which include “my palms are sweaty now,” “NOPE nopity nope nope nuh-uh no way nopers never goodness no. #TeamNOPE,” and, “I was more nervous than this guy when i was jumping over the lava in super mario game.”

H/t Das Kraftfuttermischwerk

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