Arckit

An architectural modeling tool goes mainstream.

Whether you’re a working architect or an armchair Frank Lloyd Wright enthusiast, you can now construct a Fallingwater-style structure in your living room with an Arckit set.

Designed by Irish architect Damien Murtagh, the locking plastic blocks—which are at a 1:48 scale—were initially intended as an alternative to expensive software or cut-and-glue 3D models, which may be difficult for clients to parse and tricky to tweak throughout the process. Murtagh thought that the kit could be a useful trade tool. But he also realized that it had a wider appeal. The fact that the models can be disassembled and reused makes the kit a great buy for tinkerers who like to play around with design.

Murtagh explained to Dezeen:

"I always believed that by removing the difficulties associated with traditional model making—measuring, cutting, gluing and sticking—it had the potential to open up advanced model making to everyone."

Here’s how it works:

The 160-piece set creates sleek, minimalistic structures. But if you’re jonesing for something a little less pared down, you can also buy flights of stairs or “glass” walls, or download textures to outfit your structure with shingles, bricks, paneling, or tile.

Building kits, from $70 at Arckit.

(H/T: Dezeen)

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