Arckit

An architectural modeling tool goes mainstream.

Whether you’re a working architect or an armchair Frank Lloyd Wright enthusiast, you can now construct a Fallingwater-style structure in your living room with an Arckit set.

Designed by Irish architect Damien Murtagh, the locking plastic blocks—which are at a 1:48 scale—were initially intended as an alternative to expensive software or cut-and-glue 3D models, which may be difficult for clients to parse and tricky to tweak throughout the process. Murtagh thought that the kit could be a useful trade tool. But he also realized that it had a wider appeal. The fact that the models can be disassembled and reused makes the kit a great buy for tinkerers who like to play around with design.

Murtagh explained to Dezeen:

"I always believed that by removing the difficulties associated with traditional model making—measuring, cutting, gluing and sticking—it had the potential to open up advanced model making to everyone."

Here’s how it works:

The 160-piece set creates sleek, minimalistic structures. But if you’re jonesing for something a little less pared down, you can also buy flights of stairs or “glass” walls, or download textures to outfit your structure with shingles, bricks, paneling, or tile.

Building kits, from $70 at Arckit.

(H/T: Dezeen)

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Equity

    Berlin Builds an Arsenal of Ideas to Stage a Housing Revolution

    The proposals might seem radical—from banning huge corporate landlords to freezing rents for five years—but polls show the public is ready for something dramatic.

  2. A photo of a design maquette for the Obama Presidential Center planned for Jackson Park and designed by Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects with Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates.
    Design

    Why the Case Against the Obama Presidential Center Is So Important

    A judge has ruled that a lawsuit brought by Chicago preservationists can proceed, dealing a blow to Barack Obama's plans to build his library in Jackson Park.

  3. Design

    A History of the American Public Library

    A visual exploration of how a critical piece of social infrastructure came to be.

  4. Maps

    Mapping the Growing Gap Between Job Seekers and Employers

    Mapping job openings with available employees in major U.S. cities reveals a striking spatial mismatch, according to a new Urban Institute report.

  5. Transportation

    You Can’t Design Bike-Friendly Cities Without Considering Race and Class

    Bike equity is a powerful tool for reducing inequality. Too often, cycling infrastructure is tailored only to wealthy white cyclists.