Kaffeeform

Sip from a cup made out of repurposed coffee grounds.

Science may have confirmed the health benefits of your three-mug-a-day habit, but that doesn’t mean you should go back to guzzling joe out of disposable cups. The average American office worker uses about 500 of them each year, and all that paper and polystyrene adds up—in landfills. (Don’t even get us started on K-Cups.)

One solution: putting the brewed byproducts—the grounds—to work. A German company called Kaffeeform is fabricating a line of reusable cups and saucers made from old coffee grounds.

Saucers hot off the presses. (Kaffeeform)

Designer Julian Lechner collects leftover grounds from local cafes and combines the waste with natural glues and wood grains to make a liquid composite for injection molds. Once the material hardens, it’s sturdy enough to stand up to hot coffee and dishwashing temperatures.

These earthy cups are built for espresso and, Dezeen reports, still smell like coffee. Talk about a double shot.

Cup and saucer, €25 (about $28 USD) at Kaffeeform.

(H/T Dezeen)

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