Kaffeeform

Sip from a cup made out of repurposed coffee grounds.

Science may have confirmed the health benefits of your three-mug-a-day habit, but that doesn’t mean you should go back to guzzling joe out of disposable cups. The average American office worker uses about 500 of them each year, and all that paper and polystyrene adds up—in landfills. (Don’t even get us started on K-Cups.)

One solution: putting the brewed byproducts—the grounds—to work. A German company called Kaffeeform is fabricating a line of reusable cups and saucers made from old coffee grounds.

Saucers hot off the presses. (Kaffeeform)

Designer Julian Lechner collects leftover grounds from local cafes and combines the waste with natural glues and wood grains to make a liquid composite for injection molds. Once the material hardens, it’s sturdy enough to stand up to hot coffee and dishwashing temperatures.

These earthy cups are built for espresso and, Dezeen reports, still smell like coffee. Talk about a double shot.

Cup and saucer, €25 (about $28 USD) at Kaffeeform.

(H/T Dezeen)

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Perspective

    In a Pandemic, We're All 'Transit Dependent'

    Now more than ever, public transportation is not just about ridership. Buses, trains, and subways make urban civilization possible.

  2. photo: A cyclist rides past a closed Victoria Park in East London.
    Perspective

    The Power of Parks in a Pandemic

    For city residents, equitable access to local green space is more than a coronavirus-era amenity. It’s critical for physical, emotional, and mental health.

  3. Equity

    These States Are Sowing Confusion About Cities’ Power to Fight Covid-19

    Mixed messages on the legal concept of preemption are confusing cities that want to pass stronger Covid-19 actions, like closed beaches and shelter in place.

  4. photo: San Francisco Municipal Transit Agency employees turn an empty cable car in San Francisco on March 4.
    Transportation

    As Coronavirus Quiets Streets, Some Cities Speed Road and Transit Fixes

    With cities in lockdown and workplaces closed, the big drop in traffic and transit riders allows road repair and construction projects to rush forward.

  5. Coronavirus

    The Post-Pandemic Urban Future Is Already Here

    The coronavirus crisis stands to dramatically reshape cities around the world. But the biggest revolutions in urban space may have begun before the pandemic.

×