Kaffeeform

Sip from a cup made out of repurposed coffee grounds.

Science may have confirmed the health benefits of your three-mug-a-day habit, but that doesn’t mean you should go back to guzzling joe out of disposable cups. The average American office worker uses about 500 of them each year, and all that paper and polystyrene adds up—in landfills. (Don’t even get us started on K-Cups.)

One solution: putting the brewed byproducts—the grounds—to work. A German company called Kaffeeform is fabricating a line of reusable cups and saucers made from old coffee grounds.

Saucers hot off the presses. (Kaffeeform)

Designer Julian Lechner collects leftover grounds from local cafes and combines the waste with natural glues and wood grains to make a liquid composite for injection molds. Once the material hardens, it’s sturdy enough to stand up to hot coffee and dishwashing temperatures.

These earthy cups are built for espresso and, Dezeen reports, still smell like coffee. Talk about a double shot.

Cup and saucer, €25 (about $28 USD) at Kaffeeform.

(H/T Dezeen)

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A photo of an abandoned building in Providence, Rhode Island.
    Perspective

    There's No Such Thing as a Dangerous Neighborhood

    Most serious urban violence is concentrated among less than 1 percent of a city’s population. So why are we still criminalizing whole areas?

  2. a photo of a WeWork office building
    Life

    What WeWork’s Demise Could Do to NYC Real Estate

    The troubled coworking company is the largest office tenant in New York City. What happens to the city’s commercial real estate market if it goes under?

  3. a photo of cyclists riding beside a streetcar in the Mid Market neighborhood in San Francisco, California.
    Transportation

    San Francisco’s Busiest Street Is Going Car-Free

    A just-approved plan will redesign Market Street to favor bikes, pedestrians, and public transit vehicles. But the vote to ban private cars didn’t happen overnight.

  4. Bicycle riders on a package-blocked bicycle lane
    Perspective

    Why Do Micromobility Advocates Have Tiny-Demand Syndrome?

    In the 1930s big auto dreamed up freeways and demanded massive car infrastructure. Micromobility needs its own Futurama—one where cars are marginalized.

  5. a photo of Extinction Rebellion climate change protesters in London
    Environment

    When Climate Activists Target Public Transit

    The climate protest movement Extinction Rebellion is facing a backlash after disrupting commuters on the London Underground.

×