Everybody’s favorite feel-good story is getting a theatrical release.

The day the 5-year-old cancer survivor named Batkid saved San Francisco may have passed, but bards continue to tell of that glorious moment, first with a short documentary from the Make-A-Wish Foundation and now a motion picture hitting theaters in June.

A trailer for the Warner Bros.-backed documentary is now available, and it should please die-hard fans of the Batkid canon. There’s Batkid strutting his stuff among screaming crowds, Batkid rescuing a gagged hostage, Batkid driving the Batmobile (with a little help from a car seat). It’s a stunning achievement in grassroots film-making from Dana Nachman, who put it together after raising more than $100,000 on Indiegogo.

This won’t be the last you’ll hear of Batkid. Reports E! Online: “Julia Roberts is set to produce and star in a movie based on the documentary, which debuted at the at the 2015 Slamdance Film Festival in Park City, Utah in January.”

H/t SFist

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