This is not a drill.

If you’re like us, you need that morning cup of joe. You couldn’t get through the day without it. But if you’re guzzling coffee between the hours of 8 and 9 a.m., you’re not optimizing the benefits of caffeine on your brain.

According to AsapSCIENCE, that sweet spot between 8 and 9 is when your cortisol levels naturally peak—in other words, your body is already perking you up. Drinking coffee then won’t make you more alert. It’s actually counterproductive, since the caffeine will feel less effective and you’ll end up needing more and more of it in the long run. (Remember, caffeine is a drug and you build up tolerance to it over time.)

Your best bet is to time coffee intake for dips in cortisol production, working with your biological clock. Fuel up after 9 a.m. and again (if you need an afternoon boost) between 1 and 5:30 p.m. And no matter how early or late you get up, wait at least an hour before caffeinating—cortisol spikes immediately after waking.

[H/T Science of Us]

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