This is not a drill.

If you’re like us, you need that morning cup of joe. You couldn’t get through the day without it. But if you’re guzzling coffee between the hours of 8 and 9 a.m., you’re not optimizing the benefits of caffeine on your brain.

According to AsapSCIENCE, that sweet spot between 8 and 9 is when your cortisol levels naturally peak—in other words, your body is already perking you up. Drinking coffee then won’t make you more alert. It’s actually counterproductive, since the caffeine will feel less effective and you’ll end up needing more and more of it in the long run. (Remember, caffeine is a drug and you build up tolerance to it over time.)

Your best bet is to time coffee intake for dips in cortisol production, working with your biological clock. Fuel up after 9 a.m. and again (if you need an afternoon boost) between 1 and 5:30 p.m. And no matter how early or late you get up, wait at least an hour before caffeinating—cortisol spikes immediately after waking.

[H/T Science of Us]

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Multicolored maps of Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Tampa, denoting neighborhood fragmentation
    Equity

    Urban Neighborhoods, Once Distinct by Race and Class, Are Blurring

    Yet in cities, affluent white neighborhoods and high-poverty black ones are outliers, resisting the fragmentation shown with other types of neighborhoods.

  2. Design

    The Curious Politics of a Montreal Mega-Mall

    The car-dependent suburb it’ll be built in wants to greenlight Royalmount against the city government’s wishes but it needs them to pay for the public infrastructure.

  3. Transportation

    You Can’t Design Bike-Friendly Cities Without Considering Race and Class

    Bike equity is a powerful tool for reducing inequality. Too often, cycling infrastructure is tailored only to wealthy white cyclists.

  4. Design

    There’s a Tile Theft Epidemic in Lisbon

    With a single azulejo fetching hundreds of euros at the city’s more reputable antique stores, these tiles, sitting there out in the open, are easy pickings.

  5. A photo of a new subdivision under construction in South Jordan, Utah.
    Perspective

    A Red-State Take on a YIMBY Housing Bill

    Utah’s SB 34, aimed at increasing the state’s supply of affordable housing, may hold lessons for booming cities of the Mountain West, and beyond.