Be-elastic

Custom-build your own tables and shelves with a set of SNAP supports.

Notice that your collection of stuff has outgrown your storage space? Or just tired of your side table? Now you can set up a shelf or table without heading to a furniture store or resorting to the upside-down-box trick. For a flexible approach to interior design, try SNAP—a colorful line of clip-on supports that transform just about any flat surface into a table, stand, or shelf.

SNAP is made out of steel and stronger than it looks. The top portion clamps to your surface, while the bottom is spring-loaded with a high-strength cable to hold it in place—no drills, nails, or glue required.

Available in two sizes (14” and 17”) and 16 color combinations, SNAP is easily adaptable to any nook or cranny of your home. For an unexpected, repurposed tabletop, clip them to a discarded door, mirror, bike wheel, or dartboard. Or, stack them to make a shelf. Since a set of four can support up to 154 pounds, you can pile on a bunch of books without worrying about a collapse.

The product’s Kickstarter campaign was fully funded within hours, and the pieces will start shipping in October 2015. After that, they’ll retail at a unit price of $40.

[H/T: Dezeen]

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