Zip through the skies of the Argentine capital with this new short film.

Cities and drones haven’t been a match made in heaven. In fact, some municipalities have moved to banish civilian air crafts from buzzing above all together.

In 2013, Charlottesville, Virginia, became the first U.S. city to become a no-drone zone. Richmond followed suit last month, banning remote-controlled aircrafts from public parks. Council members in New York City have introduced strict legislation that would prohibit drones from operating in the Big Apple, carrying up to a year in prison for defiant pilots.

Luckily for aerial footage fans, Buenos Aires has yet to stomp out civilian drones. Local filmmaker Willie Leniek recently piloted one over the Argentine capital. The resulting four-minute film, “Buenos Aires Desde Arribe” (From Above), gives a view of Buenos Aires that can’t be found from any rooftop. Only a drone (or a bird) can circle around the city’s obelisco, glean over the presidential palace, and do a 360 degree pirouette, overlooking the entire city scape.

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