Sacrifice distractions, not style.

Today’s top-of-the-line smartphones promise to do it all, with IM and video calls, games and fitness trackers, dating and banking apps, all of them constantly jostling for our attention. And once we’ve reached our mental saturation point, we download apps to help filter, streamline, or block out that content we've been consuming.

That’s where the Light Phone comes in. This slim device, roughly the size of a credit card, does just one thing: phone calls. Digits glow on the smooth touch screen surface, giving you just what you need to connect, nothing more. (OK, it tells the time too—but that’s it.)

The phone, fully funded on Kickstarter in eight days, comes pre-loaded with minutes and a unique number. Once you set up call forwarding with your regular phone, you can take this one on the road with you and leave your app-heavy brick at home. No more texts, no more notifications. The device’s sleek, glowing interface—which retains charge for 20 days—looks like it came from the high-tech world of Iron Man or Minority Report, but its simplicity will satisfy a Luddite.

Creators Kaiwai Tang and Joe Hollier, who met at a design incubator, say the Light Phone is “designed to be used as little as possible,” so you can focus on what’s important—what’s happening right in front of you.

The creators estimate that the $100 phone will be available for sale next summer.

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