The fast food company is wooing millennials with a painfully earnest drive-thru concept.

Good news for people who fall in the Venn diagram intersection of whimsical cyclists and Big Mac aficionados: McDonald’s has a disposable takeout package just for you!

In this video by ad agency Tribal Buenos Aires, observe the artisanal Photoshopping and handcraftsmanship of the “McBike” container, which hooks onto your bike’s handlebars so you can have your fries and “choose a healthier lifestyle,” too.

The McBike campaign, launched in Copenhagen, Denmark, and Medellín, Colombia, is the latest in a series of cringeworthy rebrands for the beleaguered chain, which has seen its market share eaten up by fast-casual competitors like Chipotle and Panera in recent years. Just in the past few weeks, McDonald’s has introduced an “artisan” grilled chicken sandwich, a kale bowl, and an inexplicable reboot of the Hamburglar—all in a transparent appeal to millennials raised on trans fat-laden Happy Meals.

Despite these efforts, the company hasn’t been able to dig itself out of the hole. Yesterday the AP reported that this year, for the first time since 1970 (and possibly ever), McDonald’s will close more stores than it opens.

So don’t let the cheery music fool you. The McBike campaign is really a cry for help: “Please, please, please keep coming to McDonald’s.”

[H/T: DesignTaxi]

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