Image by Camilla Hempleman (via designboom)

Know where to huddle for shelter from the elements, or find a park when it’s sunny.

The weather can fluctuate in an instant and, as Murphy’s Law goes, you’re bound to be caught unprepared—underdressed, overdressed, or without an umbrella. But with this heat-sensitive map in hand, you’ll always know where to take shelter—and do some exploring while you’re at it.

The “BATH °C Thermo Colour Map,” created by recent Kingston University design grad Camilla Hempleman, reacts to temperature changes to display different places to visit across the city of Bath, England. Between 25 and 30 degrees Celsius, the map glows pink with rivers, lakes, and other outdoor sites; at 15 degrees Celsius and below, it highlights indoor attractions clustered in the city center. When it’s raining, the map shows museums and other buildings where you can stay dry.

All the landmarks are hand-drawn in thermochromic inks, which respond to the weather in real time. The map is made out of waterproof Tyvek and rolls up wrinkle-free for easy storage and access.

The Thermo Colour Map is just a concept for now—Hempleman made it specifically for Bath. But we think this idea would work just as well in any city with a fickle climate. And with extreme weather events on the rise, it couldn’t come too soon.

[H/T: Designboom]

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