droPrinter

The droPrinter can make a hard copy of anything on your screen.

It’s easy enough to create and share text and images on your smartphone. But sometimes there’s no substitute for a hard copy—and chances are you won’t be near a printer when you need one. Those stone-age office machines from hell are often sequestered in inconvenient copy shops...and it seems that when you do find one of these relics, it’s either broken, jammed, or painfully slow.

With a new gadget called droPrinter, your days of emailing documents to a PC for printing may be numbered. This portable printer—fully funded on Kickstarter in just a few days—spits out anything you can display on a smartphone.

Use the droPrinter iOS or Android app to print text, images, webpages, or anything else on your screen—it’s like a Polaroid camera for cellphone screenshots. You can also generate QR codes to send printable images to your friends. Bonus: With its rechargeable battery (which lasts up to 120 hours), the gadget does double duty as a power pack for your phone.

The droPrinter uses thermal paper instead of ink (much like a cash register or fax machine), so you’ll never have to fumble with toner cartridges. The paper is easy to find online or at office supply stores and relatively inexpensive—typically a couple dollars per roll.

Measuring approximately 4 by 3 by 1 inches, it’s not conducive to printing, say, a dissertation. But when all you need is a to-do list, photo, or ticket in paper form, it’ll do the trick in a flash.

Smartphone printer, $50 pre-order on Kickstarter.

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