(Garage CCC)

“Breathe responsibly.”

Humanity, in its insatiable quest for weirder and weirder methods of intoxication, has now turned to the steam room for inspiration. An installation called “Alcoholic Architecture,” coming soon to London’s Borough Market, dispenses booze in the form of a “walk-in cloud of breathable cocktail.” It’s the creation of Bompas & Parr, a whimsical food art studio known for its bespoke jellies and fruit-flavored fireworks.

The so-called “alcoholic weather system” is a thick mist, one part spirits to three parts mixer. Guests enter the chamber wearing protective ponchos and take in alcohol through their lungs and eyeballs. Inside, the humidity is so high that you can’t see farther than one meter around. According to a press release, Bompas & Parr worked with respiratory scientists to arrive at the optimal dwell time—50 minutes, or the equivalent of about one liquid drink.

(Sam Bompas)

There’s also a conventional drink menu featuring Chartreuse, Trappist beers, Buckfast caffeinated wine, and other monastic libations—a nod to the Gothic cathedral, Southwark, next door. Guests can take these liquid drinks into the cloud with them for a double dose.

Alcoholic Architecture joins a crowded field of ways to get drunk without actually drinking, from jello shots and powdered alcohol to the mythical vodka eyeballing technique. But as non-drinking drinking methods go, we have to admit this one is uniquely immersive.

The installation opens July 31 and will run for six months. Timed tickets are £12.50, (about $20 USD) and are only available to those 18 and up.

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