The Eye of Google. 1000 Words / Shutterstock.com

A new feature called “Your Timeline” visualizes all of your pit stops.

You should know by now that Google knows everything about you. Through an array of apps and features, the company captures all kinds of personal details, from favorite websites and shopping habits to travel plans and embarrassing medical questions. This week, the company announced a new tool that offers users a glimpse of the information it’s collected on your whereabouts.

The “Your Timeline” feature draws on your Location History to visualize all the places you’ve visited—from that laundromat where you killed time playing Candy Crush to the fancy restaurant where you celebrated your anniversary. It’s more powerful than check-ins on services such as Instagram or Yelp, because it follows you in real time. If you have enabled Location History, every last pit stop is there—you know, in case you want to reminisce about all the errands you ran on Sunday afternoon, three months from now.

Your Timeline is visible only to you, and you can edit and delete locations from it at any time. Enabling Location History can come in handy: By constantly monitoring your location, it can alert you to traffic or delays on your commute, suggest restaurants or stores nearby, or remind you where you parked your car.

But if you’d rather not give in to the panopticon, you can always turn this feature off in Google Settings.

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