The Eye of Google. 1000 Words / Shutterstock.com

A new feature called “Your Timeline” visualizes all of your pit stops.

You should know by now that Google knows everything about you. Through an array of apps and features, the company captures all kinds of personal details, from favorite websites and shopping habits to travel plans and embarrassing medical questions. This week, the company announced a new tool that offers users a glimpse of the information it’s collected on your whereabouts.

The “Your Timeline” feature draws on your Location History to visualize all the places you’ve visited—from that laundromat where you killed time playing Candy Crush to the fancy restaurant where you celebrated your anniversary. It’s more powerful than check-ins on services such as Instagram or Yelp, because it follows you in real time. If you have enabled Location History, every last pit stop is there—you know, in case you want to reminisce about all the errands you ran on Sunday afternoon, three months from now.

Your Timeline is visible only to you, and you can edit and delete locations from it at any time. Enabling Location History can come in handy: By constantly monitoring your location, it can alert you to traffic or delays on your commute, suggest restaurants or stores nearby, or remind you where you parked your car.

But if you’d rather not give in to the panopticon, you can always turn this feature off in Google Settings.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Coronavirus

    Why Asian Countries Have Succeeded in Flattening the Curve

    To help flatten the curve in the Covid-19 outbreak, officials at all levels of government are asking people to stay home. Here's what’s worked, and what hasn't.

  2. photo: South Korean soldiers attempt to disinfect the sidewalks of Seoul's Gagnam district in response to the spread of COVID-19.
    Coronavirus

    Pandemics Are Also an Urban Planning Problem

    Will COVID-19 change how cities are designed? Michele Acuto of the Connected Cities Lab talks about density, urbanization and pandemic preparation.  

  3. Equity

    The Problem With a Coronavirus Rent Strike

    Because of coronavirus, millions of tenants won’t be able to write rent checks. But calls for a rent holiday often ignore the longer-term economic effects.

  4. Equity

    We'll Need To Reopen Our Cities. But Not Without Making Changes First.

    We must prepare for a protracted battle with coronavirus. But there are changes we can make now to prepare locked-down cities for what’s next.

  5. photo: a For Rent sign in a window in San Francisco.
    Coronavirus

    Do Landlords Deserve a Coronavirus Bailout, Too?

    Some renters and homeowners are getting financial assistance during the economic disruption from the coronavirus pandemic. What about landlords?

×