mangostock / Shutterstock.com

HomeSwipe is the Tinder of apartment hunting.

It was only a matter of time before someone applied the Tinder model to real estate. Enter HomeSwipe, a new app that streamlines the dreaded apartment search by letting you sift through listings with the touch of a finger.

You know the drill: Swipe right if you like the place; swipe left if you don’t. Your right swipes are saved as favorites so that you can easily return to them to contact the realtor and schedule a viewing. HomeSwipe vets all the agents in advance and uses an algorithm to weed out duplicate listings.

You can also choose from a number of filters to narrow your search, from price range and number of bedrooms to pet allowances and elevator availability.

The app was first launched in September 2014 as Skylight, then rebranded in February of this year. So far there are only about 18,000 listings for New York and 2,000 for Chicago, but co-founder Michael Lisovetsky says the company plans to expand to Phoenix, Boston, and southern California next.

Since HomeSwipe is fairly new, expect a few technical hiccups in the interim. (For instance, I couldn’t get the map to work on any of the listings.) On the plus side, technical support is very responsive—and in any case, it still beats comparison shopping across 20 browser tabs of Craigslist.

[H/T: DNAinfo]

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: Swedish journalist Per Grankvist, AKA the "Scandinavian Malcolm Gladwell."
    Environment

    To Survive Climate Change, We’ll Need a Better Story

    Per Grankvist is "chief storyteller" for Sweden’s Viable Cities program. His job: communicate the realities of day-to-day living in a carbon-neutral world.

  2. photo: Bike and pedestrian advocates participate in a "die-in" for better traffic safety in Washington, D.C.
    Transportation

    Are D.C.’s Streets Finally Getting Safer?

    As the District lagged on its Vision Zero goals, bike and pedestrian advocates in Washington turned traffic fatalities into a rallying cry, and got results.  

  3. A photo of a police officer in El Paso, Texas.
    Equity

    What New Research Says About Race and Police Shootings

    Two new studies have revived the long-running debate over how police respond to white criminal suspects versus African Americans.

  4. Design

    Reviving the Utopian Urban Dreams of Tony Garnier

    While little known outside of France, architect and city planner Tony Garnier (1869-1948) is as closely associated with Lyon as Antoni Gaudí is with Barcelona.

  5. a photo illustration of map of Denver
    Maps

    What an Old Map of Denver Can Teach a Newcomer

    There’s more to the fast-changing Mile High City than beer, hiking, and skiing. An old map gave me a clue about where to look.

×