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HomeSwipe is the Tinder of apartment hunting.

It was only a matter of time before someone applied the Tinder model to real estate. Enter HomeSwipe, a new app that streamlines the dreaded apartment search by letting you sift through listings with the touch of a finger.

You know the drill: Swipe right if you like the place; swipe left if you don’t. Your right swipes are saved as favorites so that you can easily return to them to contact the realtor and schedule a viewing. HomeSwipe vets all the agents in advance and uses an algorithm to weed out duplicate listings.

You can also choose from a number of filters to narrow your search, from price range and number of bedrooms to pet allowances and elevator availability.

The app was first launched in September 2014 as Skylight, then rebranded in February of this year. So far there are only about 18,000 listings for New York and 2,000 for Chicago, but co-founder Michael Lisovetsky says the company plans to expand to Phoenix, Boston, and southern California next.

Since HomeSwipe is fairly new, expect a few technical hiccups in the interim. (For instance, I couldn’t get the map to work on any of the listings.) On the plus side, technical support is very responsive—and in any case, it still beats comparison shopping across 20 browser tabs of Craigslist.

[H/T: DNAinfo]

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