mangostock / Shutterstock.com

HomeSwipe is the Tinder of apartment hunting.

It was only a matter of time before someone applied the Tinder model to real estate. Enter HomeSwipe, a new app that streamlines the dreaded apartment search by letting you sift through listings with the touch of a finger.

You know the drill: Swipe right if you like the place; swipe left if you don’t. Your right swipes are saved as favorites so that you can easily return to them to contact the realtor and schedule a viewing. HomeSwipe vets all the agents in advance and uses an algorithm to weed out duplicate listings.

You can also choose from a number of filters to narrow your search, from price range and number of bedrooms to pet allowances and elevator availability.

The app was first launched in September 2014 as Skylight, then rebranded in February of this year. So far there are only about 18,000 listings for New York and 2,000 for Chicago, but co-founder Michael Lisovetsky says the company plans to expand to Phoenix, Boston, and southern California next.

Since HomeSwipe is fairly new, expect a few technical hiccups in the interim. (For instance, I couldn’t get the map to work on any of the listings.) On the plus side, technical support is very responsive—and in any case, it still beats comparison shopping across 20 browser tabs of Craigslist.

[H/T: DNAinfo]

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Charts

    The Evolution of Urban Planning in 10 Diagrams

    A new exhibit from the San Francisco Planning and Urban Research Association showcases the simple visualizations of complex ideas that have changed how we live.

  2. photo: A Lyft scooter on the streets of Oakland in July.
    Transportation

    4 Predictions for the Electric Scooter Industry

    Dockless e-scooters swept cities worldwide in 2018 and 2019. In 2020, expect the battery-powered micromobility revolution to take a new direction.

  3. Life

    Can Toyota Turn Its Utopian Ideal Into a 'Real City'?

    The automaker-turned-mobility-company announced last week it wants to build a living, breathing urban laboratory from the ground up in Japan.

  4. Perspective

    Why Car-Free Streets Will Soon Be the Norm

    In cities like New York, Paris, Rotterdam, and soon San Francisco, car-free streets are emerging amid a growing movement.

  5. photo: Dominque Walker, founder of Moms 4 Housing, n the kitchen of the vacant house in West Oakland that the group occupied to draw attention to fair housing issues.
    Equity

    A Group of Mothers, a Vacant Home, and a Win for Fair Housing

    The activist group Moms 4 Housing occupied a vacant home in Oakland to draw attention to the city’s affordability crisis. They ended up launching a movement.

×