anaken2012 / Shutterstock.com

Introducing the world’s saddest desk lunch.

And you thought instant noodles couldn’t get any more “instant.”

This week a group of inventors in Shanghai unveiled what is believed to be the first ramen vending machine. Just tap the screen to select and pay, and a robotic arm combines the noodles, toppings, and soup inside. In two minutes flat, your bowl comes out piping hot. Leave it to the Chinese—the original inventors of noodles—to develop an even lazier way to make the world’s laziest food.

(Chinanews.com)           

The inventors promise that the next generation of the machine will allow users to customize their condiments—hewing curiously close to a recent gag video for the “Ramenia 21,” a household “ramen purifier” (think Keurig) offering laser-cut chopsticks and drone delivery. Ramenia 21 was, alas, totally fake. And yet—who could have predicted we’d live in a world where noodle soup could be dispensed in the same manner as Dr. Pepper? The future is now.

Top image: anaken2012 / Shutterstock.com.

[H/T: Grub Street]

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