Connel/Shutterstock.com

Will it be a smiley-face or crying-face kind of day?

Agony is a stranger’s putrid, damp armpit smothering your nose and mouth during a sweltering rush-hour journey. After 20 minutes of sweating through your work clothes on a crowded platform, you’re still waiting for the local train to lurch on through.

Short of shaking up your commute routine, there’s not a whole lot you can do to skirt this daily nightmare—but at least you can brace yourself for it by knowing exactly what pit of despair you’re descending into.

Happy July, commuters! (WNYC)

And now it’s possible to assess the situation before you head underground. New York City’s WNYC recently launched a Live Subway Agony Index, which chronicles delays in real time. The conditions correspond with emojis. Acceptable wait times receive a smiley face. Delays elicit unbridled weeping. (So do stations where more passengers enter than exit, based on turnstile data.) The tracker is currently available for the MTA’s numbered lines.

Since the MTA averages about 44,000 train delays per month, amNewYork reported, you can expect a to see more than a few disembodied sobbing faces.

Top image: Connel / Shutterstock.com.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Life

    The Cities Americans Want to Flee, and Where They Want to Go

    An Apartment List report reveals the cities apartment-hunters are targeting for their next move—and shows that tales of a California exodus may be overstated.

  2. photo: a pair of homes in Pittsburgh
    Equity

    The House Flippers of Pittsburgh Try a New Tactic

    As the city’s real estate market heats up, neighborhood groups say that cash investors use building code violations to encourage homeowners to sell.  

  3. Transportation

    In Paris, a Very Progressive Agenda Is Going Mainstream

    Boosted by big sustainability wins, Mayor Anne Hidalgo is pitching bold plans to make the city center “100 percent bicycle” and turn office space into housing.

  4. photo: San Diego's Trolley
    Transportation

    Out of Darkness, Light Rail!

    In an era of austere federal funding for urban public transportation, light rail seemed to make sense. Did the little trains of the 1980s pull their own weight?

  5. Life

    Can Toyota Turn Its Utopian Ideal Into a 'Real City'?

    The automaker-turned-mobility-company announced last week it wants to build a living, breathing urban laboratory from the ground up in Japan.

×