Watch cat videos.

Now that science has debunked all the lies your mother told you about coffee, you should feel free to caffeinate to your heart’s content. But when you can’t get your hands on a cup—or you simply can’t stomach another drop—there are a few lab-tested strategies you can use to keep your energy up.

According to this video produced by the American Chemical Society, you can stave off the afternoon slump by drinking water, getting some sun, exercising, and—believe it or not—watching cat videos. One recent study confirmed that indulging in cute animal images makes people happy, improving alertness overall. The same goes for listening to music, which activates the brain’s pleasure circuit and reduces the tiredness response.

When you’re running on empty, you should also avoid simple carbs and sugar that can slow you down even more. And, if at all possible, take a nap—even a short one can have lasting memory and attention benefits. But for everyone’s sake, you should really try to get that seven to eight hours next time—unless you plan to spend all day watching clips of Persian cats in jumbo tea cups.

Thumbnail image: Kaspars Grinvalds / Shutterstock.com.

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