Christian Mueller / Shutterstock.com

Kjaro’s patented design catches its own drips.

Getting caught in the rain is bad, but walking around the city with a wet umbrella isn’t much better. You’ve got to snake through the crowd to keep from poking someone in the eye while holding onto your other bags at the same time. Once you fold up your umbrella, the whole sopping mess inevitably drips onto your pants anyway. Sometimes it’s hardly worth the effort.

A new product called Kjaro solves all these problems in one slickly designed package. It’s not just a sturdy, weatherproof umbrella; it also comes with a leather holster that collects rainwater at the base—and drains it away with a quick twist. Drip no more.

The case can stand upright and hooks easily onto a bag to keep your hands free. You can also “wear” the umbrella on your person by attaching a large or small strap (both included).

The umbrella has its own high-design flourishes. The canopy is constructed from thick, waterproof fabric over a windproof aluminum and fiberglass frame. To stow the umbrella in the case, just roll it up and secure it with the magnetic fastener—and never fumble with worn-out Velcro again.

Umbrella innovations are a dime a dozen, but they tend to focus on the functionality of the umbrella itself—tweaking the handle, spring mechanism, and other individual components. Kjaro might be the first to address the unpleasantness of carrying one around.

Umbrella, $61 at Kickstarter.

Top image: Christian Mueller / Shutterstock.com.

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