Steve Cadman/flickr

For all of your hipster mix tape needs.

Remember the days of wooing your pimple-faced high school crush with a mix tape? You agonized over the song selection and scribbled the track names with a permanent marker. The recipient had tangible—and quite possibly embarrassing—evidence of your sweaty-palmed affection. He or she could hold onto it and spend hours wondering which of Savage Garden’s lyrics really revealed the depths of your infatuation.

Now you can rekindle that feeling of being a frustrated, lovelorn teen proud of your taste in music. Thanks to Vinylify, a DIY record-making outfit from Amsterdam, you can amp up the hipster quotient by committing your feelings to vinyl.

Vinylify

Upload the MP3 or WAV tracks of your choice, customize the cover art, then dust off your turntable before your 10-inch record arrives within four weeks.

Each record can accommodate 20 minutes of music and costs €50. It’s a steep price, especially when you could just send your beloved a link to some music videos on YouTube. But if you’re looking for a cool, grand gesture, this old-school gift might fit the bill.

Custom record, €50 at Vinylify.

[H/T: Uncrate]

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