FAST

Not your average taillight.

It’s natural to feel a little separation anxiety after stashing your bike outside. But with the FAST taillight, you can stop worrying. The Bluetooth-powered smart device sends you mobile alerts if anyone tries to tamper with your ride.

Designed by a group of engineers (and cycling enthusiasts) in Shenzhen, China, FAST detects sudden movements or shocks to the bike, which could indicate a crash or theft. Once the bike is locked and an alarm set using the FAST app, any unauthorized movement will trigger a sound/LED alarm and generate a notification on your smartphone. In the event of a crash, the app notifies your emergency contact automatically, even if you’re not physically able to.

FAST

The companion app, available for iOS and Android, allows you to monitor your bike’s “movement status” remotely. You can also use it to customize the LED display into a colorful light show—or set it to light up as soon as the sensor detects low-light surroundings.

FAST is waterproof and comes in two styles, clear and black chrome. The devices will start shipping out this November.

Taillight, $19 pre-order on Kickstarter.

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