Mighty Mug

Mighty Mug’s new barware stays upright even if you bump into it.

As Ernest Hemingway never put it: Write drunk. Edit sober. And thanks to a new line of drinkware, you can do so without fear of spills on your keyboard.

The Brooklyn-based company Mighty Mug has created a cup that won’t tip over if you bump into it. Built with patented Smartgrip technology, the cup forms a vacuum seal to lock onto any flat surface—but still detaches easily when you lift it straight up.

Choose from four designs for four different tipples—double old-fashioned, pint glass, pilsner glass, and stemmed wine glass, all made out of BPA-free, top rack-safe plastic. Mighty Mug already sells a range of desk and travel mugs with the spill-proof construction, but this is the company’s first line catering to your rowdy work happy hours (or home-office booze breaks).

So feel free to type up a storm and gesticulate wildly whenever the inspiration strikes. This cup will keep your laptop—and your precious manuscript—safe.

Mighty Mug barware, $30 (2-pack) pre-order at Kickstarter.

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