SmokyMountains.com released a map predicting the optimal times and places to see the leaves change in 2015.

Yes, we know summer isn’t officially over yet. (And in New York, Philadelphia, and other cities baking in heat waves, it still feels like a scorcher.) But it’s never too early to start planning your fall excursion—and SmokyMountains.com has just the map for that.

According to Mashable, the company used “data from NOAA precipitation forecasts, daylight and temperature forecasts, historical precipitation data for this year, as well as other government and private data sources” to put together this interactive guide to peak foliage across the country. Just nudge the map slider to see how colorful the leaves will be anywhere in the continental U.S., from now through November 14.

The forecast for October 3. (SmokyMountains.com)

A depressing 56 percent of Americans—roughly 135 million people—haven’t taken a vacation in the past year. Don’t be a statistic. Get out there and see some trees.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a photo of a tiny house in Oregon
    Design

    How Amazon Could Transform the Tiny House Movement

    Could the e-commerce giant help turn small-home living from a niche fad into a national housing solution?

  2. A portrait of Jay-Z.
    Equity

    The Roots of Jay-Z’s ‘Black Capitalism’

    Now partnering with the NFL, Jay-Z centers wealth-building in his activism, as many African Americans have before him—but without much success.

  3. The downtown St. Louis skyline.
    Perspective

    Downtown St. Louis Is Rising; Black St. Louis Is Being Razed

    Square co-founder Jack Dorsey is expanding the company’s presence in St. Louis and demolishing vacant buildings on the city’s north side.

  4. Environment

    What U.S. Cities Facing Climate Disaster Risks Are Least Prepared?

    New studies find cities most vulnerable to climate change disasters—heat waves, flooding, rising seas, drought—are the least prepared.

  5. Warren Logan
    Transportation

    A City Planner Makes a Case for Rethinking Public Consultation

    Warren Logan, a Bay Area transportation planner, has new ideas about how to truly engage diverse communities in city planning. Hint: It starts with listening.

×