SmokyMountains.com released a map predicting the optimal times and places to see the leaves change in 2015.

Yes, we know summer isn’t officially over yet. (And in New York, Philadelphia, and other cities baking in heat waves, it still feels like a scorcher.) But it’s never too early to start planning your fall excursion—and SmokyMountains.com has just the map for that.

According to Mashable, the company used “data from NOAA precipitation forecasts, daylight and temperature forecasts, historical precipitation data for this year, as well as other government and private data sources” to put together this interactive guide to peak foliage across the country. Just nudge the map slider to see how colorful the leaves will be anywhere in the continental U.S., from now through November 14.

The forecast for October 3. (SmokyMountains.com)

A depressing 56 percent of Americans—roughly 135 million people—haven’t taken a vacation in the past year. Don’t be a statistic. Get out there and see some trees.

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