Fanny Chu

Other than ramen.

We know that Japan is home to some next-level instant cuisine, like a vending machine that dispenses piping-hot ramen.

But a new poster by Berkley-based graphic designer Fanny Chu nods to the rich traditions of freshly prepared Japanese snacks. Chu illustrated 25 bites, from kakigori (sticky-sweet shaved ice) to savory omusubi (triangular rice patties swaddled with nori and stuffed with fillings such as salted salmon or bonito flakes).

One of Chu’s favorites: sakura mochi, a pink rice cake filled with red bean paste and wrapped in a pickled cherry blossom leaf.

The menu-style design includes the name, characters, and ingredients in each dish. Hang it up in your kitchen for some snacking inspiration.

Poster, $23 pre-order on Kickstarter.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: A woman crosses an overpass above the 101 freeway in Los Angeles, California.
    Transportation

    Navigation Apps Changed the Politics of Traffic

    In an excerpt from the new book The Future of Transportation, CityLab’s Laura Bliss adds up the “price of anarchy” when it comes to traffic navigation apps.

  2. Three men wearing suits raise shovels full of dirt in front of an American flag.
    Equity

    How Cities and States Can Stop the Incentive Madness

    Economist Timothy Bartik explains why the public costs of tax incentives often outweigh the benefits, and describes a model business-incentive package.

  3. photo: Swedish journalist Per Grankvist, AKA the "Scandinavian Malcolm Gladwell."
    Environment

    To Survive Climate Change, We’ll Need a Better Story

    Per Grankvist is “chief storyteller” for Sweden’s Viable Cities program. His job: communicate the realities of day-to-day living in a carbon-neutral world.

  4. photo: Bike and pedestrian advocates participate in a "die-in" for better traffic safety in Washington, D.C.
    Transportation

    Are D.C.’s Streets Finally Getting Safer?

    As the District lagged on its Vision Zero goals, bike and pedestrian advocates in Washington turned traffic fatalities into a rallying cry, and got results.  

  5. Design

    Reviving the Utopian Urban Dreams of Tony Garnier

    While little known outside of France, architect and city planner Tony Garnier (1869-1948) is as closely associated with Lyon as Antoni Gaudí is with Barcelona.

×