Fanny Chu

Other than ramen.

We know that Japan is home to some next-level instant cuisine, like a vending machine that dispenses piping-hot ramen.

But a new poster by Berkley-based graphic designer Fanny Chu nods to the rich traditions of freshly prepared Japanese snacks. Chu illustrated 25 bites, from kakigori (sticky-sweet shaved ice) to savory omusubi (triangular rice patties swaddled with nori and stuffed with fillings such as salted salmon or bonito flakes).

One of Chu’s favorites: sakura mochi, a pink rice cake filled with red bean paste and wrapped in a pickled cherry blossom leaf.

The menu-style design includes the name, characters, and ingredients in each dish. Hang it up in your kitchen for some snacking inspiration.

Poster, $23 pre-order on Kickstarter.

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