Skybuds

Skybuds promise an end to knotted cords.

The first law of commuting states that earbuds at rest will be tangled by the time you need them. (Trust us, that’s science.) Wireless varieties have been available for years now, but it’s hard to remember to keep them charged for every excursion out of the house.

A new product called Skybuds aims to solve both problems at once. These wireless earbuds are stored with your iPhone in a sleek case that doubles as a charger.

(Skybuds)

The Skybuds case also functions as an extra battery for your phone and earbuds; when you plug it in, you charge all three at once. The buds have three to four hours of battery life on the go, but they’ll charge automatically when you pop them back in the case. The companion app keeps track of battery levels and can even locate your buds if you misplace them.

The kernel-shaped buds are waterproof and ergonomically designed to fit snugly and stay put, no matter how intense your workout or jam session. Push the button on either bud to play, pause, or answer the phone—the case can take calls like a Bluetooth headset. Skybuds communicate with your phone via Bluetooth, and the buds themselves communicate with each other via near field magnetic induction.

While the buds will work with any Bluetooth-enabled phone, the case only fits iPhone 6 and 6S for now. The devices will ship in May 2016.

Skybuds, $224 pre-order on Kickstarter.

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