Kimberly Vardeman/Flickr

It’s peak fall, and people are going nuts over foliage.

As mid-October approaches, we’re solidly in prime decorative gourd season. New Englanders wait in anticipation for that iconic time of year when the vibrant colors of fall foliage finally reach their peak. For many locals, leaf peeping—yes, that’s a thing—is as simple as stepping out into the backyard or taking a ride on Amtrak’s Autumn Express train.

Meanwhile, those stuck in season-less regions are deprived of this annual treat.

But now, green-leafed West Coasters—or anyone else who really, really likes fall—can get New England foliage delivered straight to their door. Avid hiker Kyle Waring and his wife have searched throughout New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Vermont for the perfect few leaves that typify the fall season. They sell them on ShipFoliage.com. Customers receive a $19.99 bundle that has been hand-picked and assembled by the Warings.

ShipFoliage.com

Once the leaves are collected, they “undergo a unique preservation process” that involves soaking them for 2-3 days and allowing them to dry for a few more. This ensures that they’ll last long after the fall season is over—an estimated 5-7 years, according to the company’s site.

So far, Waring has seen the most demand from season-starved customers in California, Texas, and Florida. “I guess there’s something about New England foliage,” he says.

Top image: science photo / Shutterstock.com.

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