Mike Mozart / Flickr

AirPaper to the rescue.

Everyone’s got a Comcast customer service horror story. With interminable hold times, arcane procedures, and notoriously evasive representatives, the country’s largest cable provider makes even simple queries maddeningly difficult to resolve. Canceling your account with the company, though, is damn near impossible.

Now an Oakland startup is offering to take care of that hassle for you. For the low, low price of $5, AirPaper promises to cancel your Comcast account. You give them your information—including your name, address, and account number—and they initiate a cancellation request on your behalf by sending a letter to your local Comcast branch. Meanwhile, you can sit back, relax, and wait for your cable service to end in the next seven days.

(AirPaper says it will “use your information exclusively to complete the process” and “never sell your information under any circumstance”—but it’s up to you to choose between the devil you know and the startup you don’t.)

Comcast cancellation is just the beginning for AirPaper, whose stated mission is to make bureaucracy “surprisingly pleasant.” Next the startup wants to tackle San Francisco parking permit and business tax registration, as well as the visa application process for visiting China.

And Comcast, of course, isn’t the only company holding its customers hostage with aggressive retention policies. Facebook, Uber, Skype, and a whole lot of telecom firms also make it hard for you to cut the cord. The website JustDelete.me maintains a directory of links to help you delete your account on a number of popular online services. And, while we can’t confirm how effectively AirPaper gets the job done, let’s hope it sends a signal to companies everywhere: Let us go.

H/t SFist

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